Recent Posts

What is inconvenient in Myanmar (Burma)?

What is inconvenient in Myanmar (Burma)?

Dear readers, It’s a nice raining day here in Yangon. It’s wet and usually when the rain comes, the light goes off!! I know that’s one disappointing fact about Myanmar. But tonight, EPC (Electric Power Corporation) seems to be quite generous and no black out! […]

“Go, Come, Eat, Drink, Stay” in Burmese (Magic Phrase)

“Go, Come, Eat, Drink, Stay” in Burmese (Magic Phrase)

Hello! How’s everything going? Today, let’s learn some vocabularies for “daily action words“? Yes! “Go, come, eat, drink and stay” as the title!   Let’s start from asking, “How’s everything going?” I do not really want you to use a very direct translated phrase for […]

“A body and a dress” Myanmar Idiom

“A body and a dress” Myanmar Idiom

Mingalarbar! This time let’s learn something simple and new. I have a Myanmar Idiom in my mind to share with you.

So the idiom is ” အဝတ်တထည်၊ ကိုယ်တခု” “A Wut Ta Htel  Ko Ta Khu” meaning  “a body and a dress“.

You will like to use this when you want to say “I do not have anything with me; except my body wearing a dress”

Example Usage:

အဝတ်တထည် ကိုယ်တခု နဲ့ လျှောက်သွားနေတာ (A Wut Ta Hel Ko Ta Khu”  Nel. Shout Thwar Nay Tar)

Meaning: I am going around only with “a body and a dress”

 

ဘာမှမပါဘူး  (Bar Mha Ma Par Buu)

Meaning: I did not bring anything.

 

Vocabularies:

အဝတ်တထည် A Wut Ta Htel: A dress/ single wear

ကိုယ်တခု Ko Ta Khu: A body

နဲ့ Nel. : With

လျှောက်သွား Shout Thwar: Go around

 

 

Have you already had your breakfast yet? (မနက်စာ စားပြီးပြီလား။)

Have you already had your breakfast yet? (မနက်စာ စားပြီးပြီလား။)

People in Myanmar usually ask the other person  “have you already had your breakfast/lunch yet?” to show that they care about that person. It’s a greeting word  like saying “Hi, how are you?” Sometimes, it’s not only just saying “hi” but also because they want […]

Interjection “Aww,” Different meaning in Burmese

Interjection “Aww,” Different meaning in Burmese

The Interjection “Aww” I was once reading a poem that my local friend posted on Facebook and I felt like it’s a cute idea that he wrote about. He speaks fluent English and the poem is all in English. So I commented “aww…” under his […]

How to say “thank you” in Burmese (ကျေးဇူးတင်ပါတယ်) 

How to say “thank you” in Burmese (ကျေးဇူးတင်ပါတယ်) 

Hello again!

Thanks for reading our cracking Burmese blog.

Wait…. “Thanks” or “Thank You”?

What is the difference between “Thanks” and “Thank you”?

I goggled it and than it says “thanks” is just a shorten form of “thank you” and sometimes informal than “thank you”, and there is not much difference. But for me, once, one of my colleges gave small gifts to all her colleges on a special day, and on the envelopes on the greeting cards, she wrote “Thank you, (name),” for all other colleges, but then, for me she just wrote “Thanks Win Thant” and it was recently after a strong argument with her.

At that time, I was really confused why she uses “thanks” instead of “thank you” to me. Is that because she wants to write in an informal language and message me like even though we have arguments, we are just friends who knows each other better than before, or just like even though she doesn’t want to, she have to say it anyway like “Oh, thanks (very lightly and merely)” or just she writes it without any intention?

The thing is she is a type who usually brings in the issues from the past! I never asked her and I see things quite positive, so I just believed it might be the first one. Who knows! (Please feel free to share you opinions in the comment box for using “thanks” and “thank you” if you like to!).

But I can swear, “thanks” in the first line of this article has no difference with “thank you” and just a shorten form of “thank you”! Really heartfelt thank you!

Well, I hope I am not off the topic. Let’s go back to crack the “thank you” code to say it in Burmese!

In Burmese, the main word for “thank you/thanks” is “Kyay Zuu” and there are couples of particles that you can add after it depending on the situation and according to your mood. Usually, there is no special difference between them.

 

The formal one:

Kyay Zuu Tin Par Tal      ကျေးဇူးတင်ပါတယ်     

You can use “Kyay Zuu Tin Bar Tal” in every situation from saying thanks to the waiter to saying thanks to the president. It is formal and useful for different situations.

 

The informal ones:

(usually when you wants to show your friendliness than the formality or when you want to use it a bit lightly)

Kyay Zuu Par ကျေးဇူးပါ

Kyay Zuu Pal ကျေးဇူးပဲ

Kyay Zuu Naw ကျေးဇူးနော်


Adding Name or Personal Pronouns after “Thanks/Thank you”

In Burmese, we also add the name or personal pronouns after “thanks/Thank you” usually. It’s like “Thanks, Robert” “Thank you, Rosie” “Thank you, Ms.” “Thanks, bro” Etc. and it makes a bit more special, more friendly and more natural! So if you want, you can add the name of person after “Kyay Zuu Tin Bar Tal” or add the personal pronouns accordingly with the gender and age of the person you are saying “thanks,” even though he/she is a total stranger.

For example:

Kyay Zuu Tin Par Tal, Ako (thank you, bro)
ကျေးဇူးတင်ပါတယ် အကို

Kyay Zuu Tin Par Tal, Tharr (thank you, son)
ကျေးဇူးတင်ပါတယ်  သား

Kyay Zuu Tin Par Tal, Aunty (thank you, aunty)
ကျေးဇူးတင်ပါတယ် အန်တီ

I hope this article will help you in saying “thanks” in Burmese! Thank you for reading this long and please let me know if you have any question!

 

Cracking the Burmese Language Barrier – Why you SHOULD learn Burmese!

Cracking the Burmese Language Barrier – Why you SHOULD learn Burmese!

Let’s be honest, learning Burmese is much harder to learn than other languages like e.g. Spanish! Why is that? Lack of Learning Materials Burmese is a very very exotic language and there is a lack of good and high quality learning resources. This encompasses all […]

Cracking Burmese: How and when to say “It’s okay”/ “It’s alright” (ရပါတယ်)

Cracking Burmese: How and when to say “It’s okay”/ “It’s alright” (ရပါတယ်)

A Simple Cracking-Burmese Magic Code: Ya Par Tel  (It’s okay/I’m okay)uniburma ရပၝတယ္ myanmar3 ရပါတယ် zawgyi-one ရပါတယ္ There are many times that you will hear the word “Ya Par Tel” in Myanmar. Well, what does this mean?   Ya Par Tel or Ya Tel. ရပါတယ္ / ရတယ္ (I […]

Burmese Top 150 and  Top 1000 Word List

Burmese Top 150 and Top 1000 Word List

For all of you who want to increase their Burmese Vocabulary skills, we have some great resources for you!

High Frequency Word Lists!

Below you find two word lists, one for the most 150 frequent Burmese words and one for the top 1000 Burmese words.

So beginners should first look into the Top 150 list and advanced learners can download the Top 1000 list.

You will notice that both lists will not contain any Romanisation of the Burmese.

This is because we think anybody serious about learning the Burmese should actually learn the Burmese script because the Burmese script is actually the best phonetic language and if you sit down and focus it is not that difficult to learn!

 

Top 150 List

Download Excel List

Download PDF List

 

Top 1000 List

Download Excel List

Download PDF List

 

Myanmar or Burma? Burmese or Myanmar language?

Myanmar or Burma? Burmese or Myanmar language?

Have you ever wondered what is the difference between Burmese and Myanmar?  Myanmar has been changed it’s name from “Burma” to “Myanmar” in the late 1980s. Many foreigners still use the name “Burma” since it’s quite easier to pronounce than “Myanmar” and also the new […]


My Diary

How many alphabets in Burmese?

How many alphabets in Burmese?

 

Burmese writing for “Myanmar Alphabet”

 

Burmese have 33 letters. Only around 25 letters are commonly used. You will usually see the Burmese scripts in rounded form, and KG students are trained by their teachers to have beautifully rounded characterized Burmese hand-writing. The more you write rounded, they say the better you writing is!

Here are 33 consonants in Burmese.

က

ဈ  ည

 

 

Aren’t they beautiful?

 

#Burmesealphabet